Creative (and Cultural) Industry Entrepreneurship

Creative (and Cultural) Industry Entrepreneurship in the 21st Century Vol: 18, Part A, co-edited by Sara R. S. T. A. Elias, is the first of two volumes dedicated to exploring the challenges faced by creative professionals, and the entrepreneurial solutions they have developed in response.

Creative and cultural industries are growing in almost every nation around the world and over the last two decades have contributed to global, national, and local economies significantly. Recently, policy makers and those who start these creative businesses have demonstrated a greater interest in how creative entrepreneurs create, sustain and market their services and products. And how contexts influence their ‘doing business’ is of increasing importance.

Both volumes of Creative (and Cultural) Industry Entrepreneurship in the 21st Century illuminate how social contexts and recent socio-economic disruptive challenges influence value creation from start-up to growth and exit. The chapter authors take a fresh look at creative micro-businesses and SMEs, the processes leading to their formation, development, and their founders.

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Crypt in the church of Cordona hold the history of transgenerational trauma.

Transgenerational trauma: Decoding cryptonyms

Last month we began reading a special section of Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society (2012) entitled: Locating the Psychosocial – Using Klein, Bion, Winnicott, Lacan, and Relational Theory to Treat Transgenerational Trauma. This special section explicitly strives to “bridge the gap” between the clinical and academic “modes of thinking” while straddling analytic approaches to conceptualizing and treating psychic trauma. More specifically, treating the transmission of transgenerational trauma manifested as psychosis. So, with this new series of readings we extend our discussions of the psychosocial and how to think psychosocially about organizations and organizing.

Our first reading was Psychic Murder and the Asylum of Psychosis, which is Esther Rashkin’s re-reading of Mario’s case (see Faimberg, 2005) with a “psychosocial and intrafamilial” lens. She focuses on “unspoken languages”, highlighting the interplay between aliveness and deadness, and viewing enactments as a mode of communication. Rashkin is concerned with what is said and unsaid, concealed and revealed, visible and invisible.

Rashkin introduces a number of ideas that are ripe for use in the organizational context. For example:

  • Crypt - “permits the radical denial of traumatic loss by allowing its carrier or “cryptophore” to live a double life…” (p. 72)
  • Endocryptic identification – “A crypt or intrapsychic vault may form in the ego .. and house within it-buried but psychically alive-the deceased associated with the unspeakable drama… (p. 72)
  • Cryptophores – “may identify with the living dead in the crypt by way of endocryptic identification and live out…aspects of the trauma…” (p. 72)
  • Cryptonym – “word that hides…[that] resist understanding through their various linguistic transformations... but contain traces of specific traumas that can…be deciphered and read” (p. 73)

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Would you like to join us as we play with these ideas?

If so, please email: admin@surfacingtheorg.com

For more information about our group visit: surfacingtheorganization.com

The uncanny, dreams, and organizations

In “Accessing uncolonized terrains of organizations: Uncanny force of sleep and dreaming,”  Tarja Salmela, Anu Valtonen, and Susan Meriläinen (2020) explore the uncanny as a powerful perspective for revealing blind spots in organizational subjectivity and organizing. Drawing from autoethnographic material, the authors show “how the uncanniness of dreams and sleeping is experienced in organizations” (p.33).  At the root of their exploration of uncolonized organizational terrains is an unsettling of the neat physical borders that bound organizations, a problematization of binary thinking, and a questioning of static categorizations - all of which are pervasive in rationalist thinking.  

The authors introduce us to a novel way of using dreams and dreaming, the “unconcept” of uncanniness, and stories in interpreting the experience of researching and working in organizations. Yet, the article does not provide solid answers about how to link dreams to interpreting organizational culture, how to “use” the uncanny, and the role of stories and photographs in seeing and telling uncolonized terrains. 

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Whiteboardings

Whiteboardings is a unique collection of poetry co-authored by Howard F. Stein and Seth Allcorn.

As described by the authors, "We co-create poems on an imaginary whiteboard between us as we visit weekly on Skype. We have coined the term 'whiteboarding' as a verb that distills our method, how we work. Its prime values are tolerance of ambiguity and uncertainty, emergence rather than directional planning. We imagine the surface of a whiteboard in the transitional, open space between us (a notion derived from Donald Winnicott) and write on it our shared “free associations.” Spatially, this process can be visualized to be located between us rather than entirely within each of us. It feels as if the emerging poem has a life of its own, what Thomas Ogden calls a “third,” ours, neither yours nor mine. From the outside, our way of working appears formless and directionless, disorganized and messy! A poem eventually emerges from not needing to know at the outset where we are going – or even that we are going somewhere. Only along the journey through the unknown do we find the path. Yet the resulting poem feels like an amalgam, unitary, seamless, whole, perhaps even inevitable. The poems we have assembled here are the result of this unique experiment in writing poetry".

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